null
MB058629

Awelye (Women's Ceremony) for Anemangkerr (Bush Melon)

Medium
Acrylic on Linen
Size
90 x 45cm
Year Painted
2021
Love this Artwork? Let us know and leave a review!

or make 4 interest-free payments of $330.00 AUD fortnightly with Afterpay More info

Add to Cart
Free Shipping Worldwide!
This painting on linen will be shipped in a cylinder to you free of charge, worldwide! An option to have this painting 'stretched' onto a wooden frame may be available. If selected, further charges will apply and will be calculated at checkout.
$1,320.00
Or
MB058629

Awelye (Women's Ceremony) for Anemangkerr (Bush Melon)

Info

Catalogue Number:MB058629 ,Width: ,Height:

Info

Catalogue Number:
MB058629

Artist Profile

Geyla began painting in 2004 with her sister Molly after being encouraged by a v…

Artist Profile

Artist Profile

Geyla Pwerle
Born:

Unknown

Language Group:

Alyawarre

Country:

Atnwengerrp, Utopia Region, North East of Alice Springs, Northern Territory

Medium:

Acrylic on Canvas and Linen

Subjects:

Awelye (Women's Ceremony), Anemangkerr (Bush Melon) Dreaming, Akarley (Northern Wild Orange), Anthep Awelye (Ceremonial Dance), Awelye (Women's Ceremony) for Akarley (Northern Wild Orange), Awelye (Women's Ceremony) for Anemangkerr (Bush Melon)

Geyla began painting in 2004 with her sister Molly after being encouraged by a very large extended family of artists to experience the pleasure of teaching her stories in a creative way. Geyla is the younger sister of the late Minnie Pwerle, one of Australia's most renowned artists.

COLLECTIONS
Mbantua Gallery Collection, Alice Springs, NT
EXHIBITIONS
2005
Mbantua Gallery, Alice Springs, NT
2006
APS Bendi Lango Art Exhibition with Rio Tinto, Fireworks Gallery, Brisbane, QLD
2006
The Pwerle Sisters, Flinders Lane Gallery, Melbourne, VIC
2007
Standing on Ceremony, Tandanya National Aboriginal Cultural Institute, Adelaide, SA
2007
Treasures of the Spirit - Investing in Aboriginal Art, Tandanya National Aboriginal Cultural Institute, Adelaide, SA
2007
Utopia in New York, Robert Steele Gallery, New York City, NY, USA
2008
Gayla Pwerle - Fruits of the Desert, DACOU Art Gallery, Melbourne, VIC
2008
Canterbury Art Exhibition, Contemporary Australian Art, VIC
2009
Walking Together to Aid Aboriginal Health - Shalom Gamarada Aboriginal Art Exhibition, University of NSW, Kensington, NSW
2009
Utopia - Colours of the Desert, Gongpyeong Art Space in collaboration with DACOU, Australian Embassy in Korea and Crossbay Gallery, Seoul, Korea
2010
McCulloch's Aboriginal Art - The Summer Show, Salt Contemporary Art, Queenscliff, VIC
2010
Desert Rhythms, Flinders Lane Gallery, Melbourne, VIC
2010
A Summer Exhibition from The Lands, McCulloch's Aboriginal Art and Flinders Village Café, Flinders, VIC
2010
The Pwerle Sisters, Group Exhibition DACOU, Melbourne, VIC
AWARDS
2005
22nd Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards (NATSIAA), Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin, NT - Finalist
2008
25th Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards (NATSIAA), Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin, NT - Finalist

Information

Artist Name, Artwork Size, Medium, Year Painted,

Information

Artist Name:
Geyla Pwerle
Artwork Size:
90 x 45cm
Medium:
Acrylic on Linen
Year Painted:
2021
Title:
Awelye (Women's Ceremony) for Anemangkerr (Bush Melon)
Free Shipping Worldwide!:
This painting on linen will be shipped in a cylinder to you free of charge, worldwide! An option to have this painting 'stretched' onto a wooden frame may be available. If selected, further charges will apply and will be calculated at checkout.

Description

Geyla paints Awelye (Women's Ceremonial and Body Paint Designs) for the Anemangkerr, a small globular fruit that Geyla describes as being 'a little melon'. This fruit is high in Vitamin C and is favoured for its exceptional keeping qualities. Excess fruit is often threaded onto sticks, after removing the inedible black seeds. The fruit can then be dried and stored for a considerable period.

Linear designs represent Awelye. These designs are painted onto the chest, breasts, arms and thighs. Powders ground from red and yellow ochre (clays), charcoal and ash are used as body paint and applied with a flat stick with soft padding. The women sing the songs associated with their Awelye as each woman takes her turn to be 'painted-up'. Women perform Awelye ceremonies to demonstrate respect for their country and the total well-being and health of their community.

Located at
Mbantua Warehouse