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MB053826

Awelye (Women's Ceremony)

Hazel Morton Kngwarreye

Hazel Morton Kngwarreye

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Medium
Acrylic on Canvas
Size
90 x 90cm
Year Painted
2018
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MB053826

Awelye (Women's Ceremony)

Info

Catalogue Number:MB053826 ,Width: ,Height:

Info

Catalogue Number:
MB053826

Artist Profile

Hazel Morton Kngwarreye is the daughter of Katie Kemarre (second wife to Billy P…

Artist Profile

Artist Profile

Hazel Morton Kngwarreye
Born:

1964

Language Group:

Alyawarre

Country:

Ngkwarlerlaneme and Arnkawenyerr, Utopia Region, North East of Alice Springs, Northern Territory

Medium:

Acrylic on Canvas and Linen, Batik on Silk

Subjects:

Ilyarnayt (Acacia Flower), Alhepalh (Acacia Shrub), Country, Camp Scene, Awelye (Women's Ceremony), Rainbow Dreaming, Tharrkarr (Sweet Honey Grevillea), Yerrampe (Honey Ant) Dreaming

Hazel Morton Kngwarreye is the daughter of Katie Kemarre (second wife to Billy Petyarre) and comes from a large extended family. She has had an extensive career as an artist and she began painting for Mbantua Gallery in 1991.

Initially Hazel worked in the medium of batik along with over eighty other women, including many of her family, from the Utopia Region in Central Australia. During this time she was involved with the batik workshops and is represented in the Holmes à Court Collection 'Utopia - A Picture Story', 88 silk batiks, which toured extensively. Hazel was also part of 'A Summer Project' 1988-89. Many of her step sisters, cousins and her sister Janice are also artists for Mbantua Gallery, sharing many of the same stories and a similar style, unique to their large family.

COLLECTIONS
Mbantua Gallery Collection, Alice Springs, NT
Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, SA
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, ACT
The Holmes à Court Collection, Perth, WA
The Kelton Foundation, Santa Monica, USA
EXHIBITIONS
1989
Utopia Women's Paintings, the first Works on Canvas, A Summer Project, 1988-1989, S.H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney, NSW
1990
Utopia - A Picture Story, an Exhibition of 88 works on Silk by Utopian artists, Holmes à Court Collection, toured Eire and Scotland
1991
The Eighth National Aboriginal Art Award Exhibition, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin, NT
1994
Tyerabarrbowaraou 2 - I shall never become a Whiteman, 5th Havana Biennial, Cuba
2003-2004
Mbantua Gallery USA exhibitions
2014
Narrativa Herióca - Pintura Aborígine do Deserto Australiano - Renaissance Hotel, São Paulo, Brazil
2014
Arca Urbana, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
REFERENCES
Brody, A.
(1989) Utopia Women's Paintings The First Works on Canvas, A Summer Project 1988-89, exhib.cat., Heytesbury Holdings, Perth, WA
Brody, A.
(1990) Utopia: a Picture Story, 88 Silk Batiks from the Robert Holmes à Court Collection, Heytesbury Holdings, Perth, WA

Information

Artist Name, Artwork Size, Medium, Year Painted,

Information

Artist Name:
Hazel Morton Kngwarreye
Artwork Size:
90 x 90cm
Medium:
Acrylic on Canvas
Year Painted:
2018
Title:
Awelye (Women's Ceremony)
Free Shipping Worldwide!:
This painting on canvas will be shipped in a cylinder to you free of charge, worldwide! An option to have this painting 'stretched' onto a wooden frame may be available. If selected, further charges will apply and will be calculated at checkout.

Description

Hazel paints Awelye (Women's Ceremonial and Body Paint Designs) for the ancestral dreamtime stories which belong to her country, Ngkwarlerlaneme and Arnkawenyerr.

Linear designs represent Awelye. These designs are painted onto the chest, breasts, arms and thighs. Powders ground from red and yellow ochre (clays), charcoal and ash are used as body paint and applied with a flat stick with soft padding. The women sing the songs associated with their Awelye as each woman takes her turn to be 'painted-up'. Women perform Awelye ceremonies to demonstrate respect for their country and the total well-being and health of their community.

Located at
Mbantua Warehouse