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SP10579

Merne Awele Awele (Bush Tomatoes)

Medium
Acrylic on Canvas
Size
30 x 30cm
Year Painted
2010
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SP10579

Merne Awele Awele (Bush Tomatoes)

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Catalogue Number:SP10579 ,Width: ,Height:

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Catalogue Number:
SP10579

Artist Profile

Therese grew up at the Santa Teresa Mission, South East of Alice Springs, living…

Artist Profile

Artist Profile

Therese Ryder
Born:

1946

Deceased:

2023

Language Group:

Eastern Arrernte (Aranda)

Country:

Santa Teresa, South East of Alice Springs, Northern Territory

Medium:

Acrylic on Canvas and Linen, Watercolour on Board

Subjects:

Women Collecting Merne Alangkwe (Bush Banana), Merne Atwakeye (Wild Orange), Angkwerrpme (Mistletoe), Merne Alangkwe (Bush Banana), Uluru, Ntang (Edible Seeds), Untitled Landscape, Awele Awele (Bush Tomatoes), Women Collecting Yerrampe (Honey Ant), W

Therese grew up at the Santa Teresa Mission, South East of Alice Springs, living in a dormitory and being cared for by Catholic nuns. The girls were taught cooking, sewing and house cleaning. Drawing lessons were given once a week at school.

There are references to a number of staff at the mission encouraging drawing and painting - Sister Therese Marie, Sister Anastasia, Dr Ethel Robertson and Mr. Sawjack. These were strong influences in the development of the landscape painting. It is interesting to note from text that the immerging artists from Santa Teresa were only partially aware of Albert Namatjira and his fame as a watercolourist landscape painter. Therese, Kathleen Wallace, Gabriella Wallace and others entered work in the Alice Spring Show often winning prizes.

Therese moved to Alice Springs and painted ever since in both landscape style and the more traditional dot style, interpreting bush foods.

COLLECTIONS
Mbantua Gallery Collection, Alice Springs, NT
EXHIBITIONS
1988
Pmere - Country in Mind, Arrernte Landscape Painters, Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs, NT
1989
The Sixth National Aboriginal Art Award Exhibition, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin, NT
1989
A Myriad of Dreaming: Twentieth Century Aboriginal Art, Westpac Gallery, Melbourne, VIC
1991
Heritage of Namatjira, Flinders University Art Museum, Bedford Park, SA
1991
Aboriginal Women's Exhibition, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW
1992-1993
Heritage of Namatjira, Flinders University Art Museum, Bedford Park, SA
1993
Central Australian Aboriginal Art and Craft Exhibition, Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs, NT
2002-2004
Mbantua Gallery USA exhibitions
REFERENCES
Diggins, L.
(1989) A Myriad of Dreaming: Twentieth Century Aboriginal Art, exhibit. Cat., Malakoff Fine Art Press, North Caulfield, VIC
Green, J.
(1988) Pmere: Country in Mind, Arrernte Landscape Painters, Tangentyere Council, Alice Springs ©
Green, J.
(1994) A Learner's Guide to Eastern and Central Arrernte, Institute of Aboriginal Development Press, Alice Springs ©
Hardy, J., Megaw, JVS. & Megaw, MR.
(1992) The Heritage of Namatjira - The Watercolourists of Central Australia, William Heinemann, Australia

Information

Artist Name, Artwork Size, Medium, Year Painted,

Information

Artist Name:
Therese Ryder
Artwork Size:
30 x 30cm
Medium:
Acrylic on Canvas
Year Painted:
2010
Title:
Merne Awele Awele (Bush Tomatoes)
Free Shipping Worldwide!:
This painting on canvas will be shipped in a cylinder to you free of charge, worldwide! An option to have this painting 'stretched' onto a wooden frame may be available. If selected, further charges will apply and will be calculated at checkout.

Description

Therese paints the Merne Awele Awele, known as the wild tomato or gooseberry. Merne means food in Therese's language and Awele Awele is the wild tomato. The clonal sub-shrub of the awele awele grows most commonly on foothills and lower hill slopes throughout Central Australia. It produces beautiful purple flowers and velvety grey or bluish-green leaves and the tomatoes are produced in abundance during good moisture conditions. Once collected, the Aboriginal people eat the tomatoes raw or put them in the hot earth by the fire and cook them.

Located at
Mbantua Warehouse