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MB057622

Women Collecting Alhepalh (Acacia Shrub)

Medium
Acrylic on Canvas
Size
60 x 45cm
Year Painted
2021
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MB057622

Women Collecting Alhepalh (Acacia Shrub)

Info

Catalogue Number:MB057622 ,Width: ,Height:

Info

Catalogue Number:
MB057622

Artist Profile

Janice Clarke Kngwarreye Born: c. 1958 Language Group: Alyawarre Country:…

Artist Profile

Janice Clarke Kngwarreye

Born: c. 1958

Language Group: Alyawarre

Country: Ngkwarlerlaneme and Arnkawenyerr , Utopia Region, North East of Alice Springs

Medium: Acrylic on Canvas, Linen and Wood, Silk Batik, Wood Carvings

Subjects: Alhepalh (Acacia dictyophleba), Country, Ilyarnayt (Acacia validinervia), Bush Food, Rainbow Dreaming, Bush Flowers

Janice comes from a strong family of artists working in painting, carving and batik. Her husband, Wally Clarke Pwerle, is a respected painter and carver. Her work is represented in the collections of Holmes á Court, National Gallery of Australia and the National Gallery of Victoria. Janice participated in the 'Utopia Paintings, the First Works on Canvas, A Summer Project' and 'Utopia – A Picture Story' an exhibition of 88 works of silk.

Collections

Mbantua Gallery Permanent Collection, Alice Springs

The Holmes á Court Collection, Perth

National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne

Exhibitions

1989 Utopia Women's Paintings, the First Works On Canvas, A Summer Project, 1988-89, S.H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney
1990 Utopia A Picture Story, an exhibition of 88 works on silk from the Holmes á Court Collection by Utopia artists which toured Eire and Scotland
1990 Contemporary Aboriginal Art from the Robert Holmes á Court Collection, Harvard University, University of Minnesota, Lake Oswego Centre for the Arts, USA
1991 Aboriginal Women's Exhibition, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney
1998 Dreamings, Vlaams-Europeesch Conferentiecentrum, Brussels, Belgium
1998 Museum Dorestad, Wijk bij Duurstede, The Netherlands
1998 The Hague Unites the Nations, Grote Kerk, The Hague, The Netherlands
1998 Volkenkundig Museum, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Further References

Brody, A. 1989, Utopia Women's Paintings: the First Work on Canvas, A Summer Project 1988-89., cat., Heytesbury Holdings, Perth
Brody, A. 1990 Utopia, a Picture Story, 88 Silk Batiks from the Robert Holmes á Court Collection, Heytesbury Holdings Ltd Perth
Johnson. V 1994 The Dictionary of Western Desert Artists, Craftsman House, East Roseville, New South Wales
1990 Contemporary Aboriginal Art from the Robert Holmes á Court Collection, exhib. cat., Heytesbury Holdings Ltd Perth 1991, Aboriginal Women's Exhibition, exhib. cat., Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney
NATSIVAD Data Base 1997

Information

Artist Name, Artwork Size, Medium, Year Painted, Title, Free Shipping Worldwide!,

Information

Artist Name:
Janice Clarke Kngwarreye
Artwork Size:
60 x 45cm
Medium:
Acrylic on Canvas
Year Painted:
2021
Title:
Women Collecting Alhepalh (Acacia Shrub)
Free Shipping Worldwide!:
This painting on canvas will be shipped in a cylinder to you free of charge, worldwide! An option to have this painting 'stretched' onto a wooden frame may be available. If selected, further charges will apply and will be calculated at checkout.

Description

Janice's painting represents women collecting Alhepalh (Acacia dictyophleba), a sparsely branched shrub that is found abundantly near Janice's home in the Utopia region in Central Australia. Janice depicts the women by using traditional U shaped symbols, accompanied by their digging sticks and coolamons (carved wooden bowls) which are typical instruments used for collecting many bush foods. The coolamons are full of alhepalh.

Alhepalh produces small soft coated brown seeds that the women would collect, grind into a paste and cook into damper (bread) making it a most important food source. This practice however is not habitual now due to ready made bread.

'Alhepalh-penh ntang inem athaynteyew'

The seeds from the alhepalh are collected so that they can be ground up.

Depending on the size of the shrub, its trunk can also be used to fashion into spears and digging sticks and was traditionally an important trade object. Alhepalh also has medicinal properties and produces small fragrant flowers.

Located at
Mbantua Darwin Gallery (MGD)

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